Breadboard-able LPC1114 ARM Cortex-M0 Followup

Around the beginning of the year I posted this article about my idea for a breakout board for NXP’s LPC1114 ARM Cortex-M0 microcontrollers after being inspired their announcement for a DIP packaged Cortex-M0 micro. Earlier this month I received the PCBs for my design and built two of the boards using my reflow oven.

In the above pictures I didn’t populate the power LED, but everything else is in place and tested. The LPC1114 QFN package was actually a pleasure to work with using solder paste and a reflow oven. I didn’t have a small enough tip for my solder paste which meant I had a little too much solder in places but that was easily cleaned up with a fine tipped iron. The most obvious place where there is too much solder is around the crystal oscillator on the right, and the 0805 capacitors on the left of the board.

After building two of the boards there were a few things I was happy with, and a few more disappointments. Firstly due to the pin layout of the LPC1114 chip in the QFN package I could make this breakout board quite small and still keep a fairly large ground plane. The small size was a goal of mine especially considering I wanted to be able to plug this board into a standard breadboard. It was almost something I would use!

Now on to the disappointments: My idea presented in my other post about reset and boot-loader buttons was a failure. I had an idea of using small edge mounted buttons to reset and enter the boot-loader mode on the LPC1114. While the idea worked in terms of functionality the implementation failed in terms of ergonomics. Pressing the buttons to load code onto the chip was an unpleasant experience which I think cost too much in usability. My next gripe which I thought might be a problem is that I still need to hook up an external device (In this case a FTDI USB to UART chip) to reprogram the LPC1114. Lastly the silkscreen on the board was blurry! Although this was my fault for making the size too small. It was legible, but it is nice to be able to read which pins you are connecting without squinting.

I am quite happy with building these breakout boards as a learning experience. I do plan on making a second revision which incorporates what I have learned. I plan on doing away with the buttons and instead adding a small FTDI USB to UART chip in a QFN package. This can also be used along with lpc21isp software to automatically reset and enter the ISP boot-loader. As an added bonus this would add USB serial functionality to the board without adding anything extra for easy debugging and prototyping. The external crystal could also be eliminated  with the pins being broken out so that any crystal could be used. This would offset some of the cost added with the FTDI chip and USB connector, especially considering the LPC1114 has a 12MHz internal oscillator.

I will post schematics and layouts for the updated version 2 of my breadboard-able ARM microcontrollers once I have them ready to send off.

LPC1769 Fast Fourier Transform

I recently discovered that NXP has published a DSP library for their ARM Cortex-M3 microcontrollers and I thought it would be fun to write an FFT example using my OpenLPC dev board. It works wonderfully!

I apologize for the video of a computer monitor, the screen capture software didn’t run well when trying to refresh the terminal that quickly.

The example code is actually fairly simple seeing as the heavy lifting is done by the pre-complied library. I turn on and set up the on-chip analog to digital converter and then take 1024 samples storing them in SRAM. There are no imaginary samples so I just store 0 every other sample. The array is then sent as an argument to the Fast Fourier Transform function along with a separate pointer to another location in SRAM on the LPC1769 where the results are stored. The magnitude is then calculated and scaled for printing to the terminal. Because I am using a higher resolution FFT I just print a few of the frequency bins (in the video I print 74) so that it will fit on my screen. My current code doesn’t use interrupts and so the sampling frequency depends on the execution time to store the ADC results in  SRAM along with some logic operations and the 65 clock cycles for the actual conversion. When it is all set and done I repeat the process at 20Hz.

The hardware setup was very simple. An arbitrary signal comes from my function generator centered at 1.5V and fed through an RC low pass filter with a cutoff frequency at ~70KHz for anti-aliasing. This is roughly around the Nyquist frequency of the ADC as I am sampling at around 160KSPS. For practical applications this wouldn’t work well and would allow a lot of signals to alias into the sampled signal, however it takes the edge off of what I was working with.

In all it took a couple hours to get everything set up and running correctly. I will clean up my code and use interrupts in the future to get a more predictable sampling frequency. For now my code is available on my GitHub repository.

https://github.com/willhb/lpc/tree/master/fft_adc.lpc17xx